A poem-a-day for National Poetry Month

Posts tagged “Shanna Germain

Prompt #28: Roundel

Today’s prompt brought to you by Dorothy Parker and Shanna Germain:

First, read Dorothy Parker’s poem, “Roundel” below:

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She’s passing fair; but so demure is she,
So quiet is her gown, so smooth her hair,
That few there are who note her and agree
She’s passing fair.

 

Yet when was ever beauty held more rare
Than simple heart and maiden modesty?
What fostered charms with virtue could compare?

 

Alas, no lover ever stops to see;
The best that she is offered is the air.
Yet- if the passing mark is minus D-
She’s passing fair.
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Now, attempt a Roundel of your own. The directions as well as a few more examples can be found at Wikipedia.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #22: Recycle, Reuse, Rewrite

Today’s prompt is brought to you by Shanna Germain and Earth Day:

Today is Earth Day! Explore our complicated relationship to Mama Earth by recycling. Find an old poem or two that you’ve abandoned and find a line, a title or a concept that really grabs you. Now use those to start a new poem, going in a direction entirely different than the original.

 

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #14: Poem in Your Pocket

Today’s poetry prompt brought to you by Shanna Germain.

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Today is National Poem in your Pocket day! To celebrate today, readers are encouraged to find a poem they love and carry it in their pocket to share with friends, family and loved ones.

For your prompt, imagine that the poem you love has spent all day riding around in your pocket, being folded and unfolded, creased and straightened, shown off to people who got it and people who didn’t… Now, write your poem from the poem’s point of view. What did it see? What did it hate or love or fear? What did it feel like in your pocket, in your hands, when you accidentally dropped it on the street?

Alternatively, write a poem about pockets. You might try reading “Pockets,” by Howard Nemerov for inspiration.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

 


Prompt #11: PostSecret

Today’s prompt brought to you by Shanna Germain and PostSecret:

PostSecret is a place where people create anonymous postcards of their innermost secrets. Which, to me, is kind of a poetry all its own. Today’s prompt is to visit the PostSecret website and search for a secret (or secrets) that speaks to you. Now, create a narrative poem based on that secret.

Alternatively, you can write a postcard poem (with or without the artwork) in which you share a secret of your own.

 

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #09: Metonymy

Today’s prompt brought to us by Shanna Germain:

We hear a lot about similes and metaphors when it comes to poetry, but we don’t often hear about metonymy. Metonymy is, according to Wikipedia, “a figure of speech used in rhetoric in which a thing or concept is not called by its own name, but by the name of something intimately associated with that thing or concept.” A good example is “drinking” which originally meant “to consume any liquid” and now typically means “to consume alcohol.”

Read all about Metonymy here.

Then read Out, Out by Robert Frost, as an example of a poem using metonymy.

Now, write your poem, either using metonymy for your subject matter or else talking about the idea of how one thing morphs into another through language and expression.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!