A poem-a-day for National Poetry Month

Posts tagged “Poetry

Prompt #30: Celebrating Poetry

Today’s prompt is brought to you by all of the authors who’ve managed to write all 30 poems or a single poem to help us celebrate National Poetry Month!

Surely you’ve read some amazing poems from your fellow poets this month. Choose one that had an impact on you and use that particular poem as inspiration for a new poem of your own. For fun, include the link back to the original poem, as well as to your own.

And then? And then, you can give yourself an amazing pat on the back (or a huge glass of wine — or whatever your celebratory experience of choice is!) and lean back and relax. You’ve done an amazing thing, dedicating a whole month to poetry! And now there’s only eleven months until you can do it again! Hurray!

 

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #27: Still Life

Today’s photos and prompt brought to you by Shanna Germain:

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Using one of the photos above or below, write a ‘still-life’ poem. The goal is to recreate the image(s) with your own filter while still keeping some of the essence of the original. It’s a good time to think about objects and what significance they have on their own versus the significance that is given to them by the viewer/artist/poet.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #26: Quiet Windows

Today’s prompt is brought to us by Miss Gina Williams:

Turn off the noise. Go to a window. Write what you see, feel and/or want in a stream-of-consciousness form.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #24: Chain Renga

Today’s form prompt is brought to us today by Nikki Magennis. It’s all about the Chain Renga, a cool but complicated poem structure. You can join with friends, use the poems to jump off from or follow along with Nikki’s prompt in the comments.

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Jasmine Revolution – Chain renga

Would anyone like to join in a chain renga? We need at least three people.

The idea of renga is to express ‘change’ – more on that below.

The poem will be written over 36 verses, alternating 5-7-5 stanzas with 7-7 stanzas.  Each verse should relate to the previous one, whether overtly or obliquely. There are various other subtle and complex rules and ideas, but I propose we treat the form fairly loosely to begin with.

I propose a title/starting point of ‘Jasmine Revolution’.

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More on the form here, taken from the Wikipedia entry<a href = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renga/a>:

‘The essence of renga is in the idea of “change” (変化, henka?). Bashō described this as “newness (新み, atarashimi?), and as “refraining from stepping back”.
A renga starts with a hokku of 5-7-5 sound units. This is followed by the second verse of 7-7 sound units, called the waki (脇?, “side”), and then by the third verse of 5-7-5 sound units, called the daisan (第三?, lit., “the third”). The next verse will be 7-7 sound units, and this pattern is repeated until the desired length is achieved.
The kasen renga, favored by Basho because it was easier to complete 36 verses in one night than the normal 100-link renga, has three sections of development. The beginning, called the jo should reflect the atmosphere of the beginning of a social evening – everyone is very polite, restrained, cautious and referring to the reason for the gathering.

The middle part of the kasen renga (verses 7 – 29) are more loose, and will include themes not allowed in the beginning and end such as love, religion, and laments. This reflects the conversation flow during dinner when the wine has been consumed and the participants are feeling free and friendly. The kyu is the rapid finish and involves the last six verses. The speed in this section is much like the broken conversation of people as they prepare to leave the party and people are quickly winding up their conversations.

The ageku is the final verse. It is considered fine if the final verse makes some reference or has a tie to the hokku or beginning verse.
A renga and its participants are judged on how well each link relates to the previous one. The most common technique of linkage used by beginning English writers is simple stream of consciousness. The previous verse reminds the writer of something else and then adds that image to the poem.

Examples and more ideas on the form here: http://www.renga-platform.co.uk/webpages/renga_01.htm

‘The two key principles of renga are link and shift. Link means that each verse should connect in some way with its immediate predecessor. Shift means that, with the exception of the link just noted, each verse should move on, drawing on imagery, which is new’

 

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #21: Sharing the Love

Today’s prompt brought to us by poet Christopher Luna.

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Go the website of your favorite poet. Copy the first line in their most recent post, and use it as the first line in your poem.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #20: Personify

Today’s prompt created by poet Sage Cohen.

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Personify Something and Invite it to Surprise You
Choose an object, any object. Don’t think too much about it. Just take what comes. Write it down.
Now quickly, off the top of your head, write down answers to these questions:

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What kind of shoes does this object wear?

What does it eat for breakfast – or dessert?

Where does it live?

Who are its friends?

How does it sleep?

Where does it go on vacation?

Who is its big brother?

What is its middle name?

How does it sing?

What does it taste like?

Who does it love?

What does it want you to know?

What did it borrow?

What country, state, neighborhood does it live in?

What does it believe?

Who is its favorite movie star?

What kind of music does it listen to?

What do you admire about this object?

What do you hate about it?

Who in your family does this object remind you of?

What grade in school is this object in?

What does this object dream about?

Who would this object vote for as president?

What does this object want to be when it grows up?

Where does this animal belong?

Where doesn’t it belong?

Who is its best friend?

What does it do when no one is looking?

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Take whatever interests you about that object you’ve been writing about and let it lead you into a poem.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #19: Lightbulbs

Today’s prompt is provided by ReadWritePoem:

Visit last year’s prompt at ReadWritePoem. Then, list 3-5 lightbulb moments you’ve had in your lifetime. Is there a way to string them together in a single poem? Try it now.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #15: Kinetic Wordplay

Today’s prompt brought to us by poet Christopher Luna.

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Write a poem using the following words: kinetic, tendril, bliss, embolden, blossom.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #14: Poem in Your Pocket

Today’s poetry prompt brought to you by Shanna Germain.

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Today is National Poem in your Pocket day! To celebrate today, readers are encouraged to find a poem they love and carry it in their pocket to share with friends, family and loved ones.

For your prompt, imagine that the poem you love has spent all day riding around in your pocket, being folded and unfolded, creased and straightened, shown off to people who got it and people who didn’t… Now, write your poem from the poem’s point of view. What did it see? What did it hate or love or fear? What did it feel like in your pocket, in your hands, when you accidentally dropped it on the street?

Alternatively, write a poem about pockets. You might try reading “Pockets,” by Howard Nemerov for inspiration.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

 


Prompt #12: Triad

Today’s prompt is from the mind of Gina Williams:

Write a poem incorporating last line of your favorite song, the main spice or ingredient in your favorite dish, and a geologic form (basalt, plateau, syncline).

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #11: PostSecret

Today’s prompt brought to you by Shanna Germain and PostSecret:

PostSecret is a place where people create anonymous postcards of their innermost secrets. Which, to me, is kind of a poetry all its own. Today’s prompt is to visit the PostSecret website and search for a secret (or secrets) that speaks to you. Now, create a narrative poem based on that secret.

Alternatively, you can write a postcard poem (with or without the artwork) in which you share a secret of your own.

 

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #10: Mad Libs

Today’s prompt comes from poet Sage Cohen.

Make a Mad Lib

Following are two poems that employ imagery and music in ways that are not confined to telling a clear, linear narrative. Notice how these poets use language. What does the skin of an orange have to do with being unmarried? How does scenery sharpen like a pencil? After fully breathing in the experience of each poem, fill in the blanks to create your own Mad Libs version. (You can do one or both; or riff on this in some other way that speaks to you.)

Feel free to be experimental with language, and to use words that feel right but don’t necessarily make “sense.” The trick is to find a way to get loose, without thinking too much as you write.

This is one of my very favorite exercises, as it has yielded some of the wildest and most interesting results…Have fun!

Jacksonville, Vermont

By Jason Shinder

 

Because I am not married, I have the skin of an orange

 

that has spent its life in the dark. Inside the orange

I am blind. I cannot tell when a hand reaches in

 

and breaks the atoms of the blood. Sometimes

 

a blackbird will bring the wind into my hair.

Or the yellow clouds falling on the cold floor are animals

 

beginning to fight each other out of their drifting misery.

 

All the women I have known have been ruined by fog

and the deer crossing the field at night.

 

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_________, __________ [City, State]

 

Because I am not ____________, I have the skin of an _________

 

that has spent its life _______ _______ _______. Inside the ________

I am ________. I cannot tell when a __________ reaches in

 

and ___________ the atoms of the ___________. Sometimes

 

a __________ will bring the _________ into my _________.

Or the yellow _____________ falling on the __________ floor are __________

 

beginning to _________ each other out of their drifting ____________.

 

All the ____________ I have known have been ____________ by fog

and the _____________ crossing the ____________ at night.

 

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From Inside Great Distances

By Walid Bitar

From inside great distances (don’t call them dreams)

midnight is smaller than usual,

as are the ponies. Inside great distances,

unlike airplanes, are not seats

and the people far away enough

to shout to (at least the talk isn’t small)

have no laps or throats when they sit beside

their donkeys and don Quixotes, pretending

to be mirages in a cold climate. The scenery

sharpens like a pencil in my ear.

It sketches itself, and I hear of this

a bird you can color with the whites

and marbles of villas back home, bird otherwise

invisible as the price of land.

An hour, too, is invisible; why are

you feeding it at your breast, growing

it into days, months, years?

Leave it alone; visit me a little to

the North; people shave their heads

into mirrors here; I

remain (on the outside) myself.

 

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From Inside Great _______________

From inside great ______________ (don’t call them _____________)

________________ is smaller than usual,

as are the ______________. Inside great ______________,

unlike ______________, are not ______________

and the people ______________enough

to ______________ to (at least the ______________ isn’t small)

have no ______________ or ______________ when they sit beside

their ______________ and don ______________, pretending

to be ______________ in a cold climate. The scenery

sharpens like a ______________ in my ear.

It ______________ itself, and I hear of this

a ______________you can color with the whites

and marbles of ______________ back home, ______________ otherwise

invisible as the price of ______________.

An ______________, too, is invisible; why are

you feeding it at your ______________, growing

it into ______________?

Leave it alone; ______________ me a little to

the ______________; people shave their heads

into ______________ here; I

remain (on the outside) ______________.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #09: Metonymy

Today’s prompt brought to us by Shanna Germain:

We hear a lot about similes and metaphors when it comes to poetry, but we don’t often hear about metonymy. Metonymy is, according to Wikipedia, “a figure of speech used in rhetoric in which a thing or concept is not called by its own name, but by the name of something intimately associated with that thing or concept.” A good example is “drinking” which originally meant “to consume any liquid” and now typically means “to consume alcohol.”

Read all about Metonymy here.

Then read Out, Out by Robert Frost, as an example of a poem using metonymy.

Now, write your poem, either using metonymy for your subject matter or else talking about the idea of how one thing morphs into another through language and expression.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #07: Wrong Hands

Today’s prompt bought to us by Mike Ferguson.

Start by watching this video.

Mike says: I am recently obsessed with magic. Not just any magic. The top shelf stuff. Homer Liwag is an amazing slight of hand artist, and yet he is known for having “the worst hands in magic.” By some bad luck of the genetic draw, they are chronically as dry as the desert. This is one of the reasons I find Homer’s performance so poetic, the striking contrast between the beauty of the movement and his “retired” hands. They seem like the wrong hands…not to mention the fact that when you’re looking for the coins, you are almost always looking at the wrong hand.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #06: Flora

Today’s prompt is from poet Bill Noble:
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Scrolling down from the top of this page you’ll find a display of the astonishing variety of one species of spring-blooming iris in the wild lands around my home, Iris douglasii. The prompt? Spring. The general exuberance and complexity of life. Any or all of the erotic associations blooms have (the fleur-de-lis is supposed to be not just an iris but stylized male genitals). Or none of the above.
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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!



Prompt #05: Strange Little Drawing

Today’s written prompt and image is from Jeremy Edwards.

This prompt is sort of like the infamous New Yorker caption contest. (Infamous because I never won.) Only instead of a caption, your challenge is to create a poem that’s inspired–however loosely–by the strange little drawing I’ve created. So let your imaginations run wild! I think he/she/they/it need(s) all the help you can provide in making some sense.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

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Prompt #04: Book + Picture

Today’s prompt is brought to us by Robin Sampson.

Grab a book of poetry. Try not to be too picky. From the last line of the first poem, take a word or phrase and write it down. Now, from the first line of the last poem, take a word or phrase and write it down. Now, from a random line from a random poem somewhere in between the first and the last poems, take a word or phrase and write it down. With those three words or phrases, and this picture, write.



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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #02: Unwritten Desire

Today’s prompt brought to us by poet Christopher Luna.

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Write a poem in the form of a letter to a person you desire but have not told, telling him or her what you would like to do to them.

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!


Prompt #01: No Narrative

Today’s prompt, to kick off our 30 days of poetry writing, is brought to us by poet Sage Cohen.

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Reveal Something Without a Narrative

My invitation today is to say something without actually saying it. To reveal something through a series of images, rhythms, and sounds that give us more of an experience of, or a feeling about, what happened rather than the actual facts, events and story line. The following questions are designed to help you get loose and wander into a scene or two in which you might want to include your reader.

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How do you pray? If you don’t pray, what do you do instead – and how do you do it?

What should you have done?

What can a person die of?

What surrounds your house? How does it protect you or not?

Who left you?

How did they do it? What did their face look like as they left?

What were they moving toward, instead?

What do you want to say to God about this departure?

What do you want to say to the person who left?

Where did it leave you? Doing what?

(This prompt was inspired by Larissa Szporluk’s poem “Solar Wind.” I encourage you to find it and compare it to your poem once you have written yours.)

 

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Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!



About to Begin!

Welcome all of you who’ve committed to doing a poem-a-day for the month of April. We’re just about ready to kick off the big event — hope you’re revving your poetry engines out there and getting your schedule cleared (ha!). In the meantime, we hope you’ll continue to spread the word about poem-a-day: The more poets and writers we have on board, the merrier! There is always a place for more poetry in the world.

In addition, if you’re a poet, we’re still looking for a few good prompts. Want to give a form challenge? How about offering up an inspirational image or quote as a jump-off point? Just send your prompts to notwithoutpoetry@gmail.com.

Two more days before the wild poeming begins!