A poem-a-day for National Poetry Month

Latest

Goodbye, And Thanks for the Fish…

A little love magic from Leonard Cohen today, as a way to say thank you for all the amazing poems this month. Keep up the wild poeming when you can, and come back next year so we don’t miss you too much…
All the best, Shanna
***
***
Hey, That’s No Way To Say Goodbye by Leonard Cohen
*
I loved you in the morning, our kisses deep and warm,
your hair upon the pillow like a sleepy golden storm,
yes, many loved before us, I know that we are not new,
in city and in forest they smiled like me and you,
but now it’s come to distances and both of us must try,
your eyes are soft with sorrow,
Hey, that’s no way to say goodbye.
I’m not looking for another as I wander in my time,
walk me to the corner, our steps will always rhyme
you know my love goes with you as your love stays with me,
it’s just the way it changes, like the shoreline and the sea,
*
but let’s not talk of love or chains and things we can’t
untie,
your eyes are soft with sorrow,
Hey, that’s no way to say goodbye.
I loved you in the morning, our kisses deep and warm,
your hair upon the pillow like a sleepy golden storm,
yes many loved before us, I know that we are not new,
in city and in forest they smiled like me and you,
but let’s not talk of love or chains and things we can’t
untie,
your eyes are soft with sorrow,
Hey, that’s no way to say goodbye.
**

Prompt #30: Celebrating Poetry

Today’s prompt is brought to you by all of the authors who’ve managed to write all 30 poems or a single poem to help us celebrate National Poetry Month!

Surely you’ve read some amazing poems from your fellow poets this month. Choose one that had an impact on you and use that particular poem as inspiration for a new poem of your own. For fun, include the link back to the original poem, as well as to your own.

And then? And then, you can give yourself an amazing pat on the back (or a huge glass of wine — or whatever your celebratory experience of choice is!) and lean back and relax. You’ve done an amazing thing, dedicating a whole month to poetry! And now there’s only eleven months until you can do it again! Hurray!

 

***

Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

Prompt #29: Free Day

Today is a free day! Go write that poem that’s been lying in wait. Or use one of the prompts that you had to skip previously. Or just start something deliciously, gloriously new!

***

Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

Prompt #28: Roundel

Today’s prompt brought to you by Dorothy Parker and Shanna Germain:

First, read Dorothy Parker’s poem, “Roundel” below:

*
She’s passing fair; but so demure is she,
So quiet is her gown, so smooth her hair,
That few there are who note her and agree
She’s passing fair.

 

Yet when was ever beauty held more rare
Than simple heart and maiden modesty?
What fostered charms with virtue could compare?

 

Alas, no lover ever stops to see;
The best that she is offered is the air.
Yet- if the passing mark is minus D-
She’s passing fair.
***
 

Now, attempt a Roundel of your own. The directions as well as a few more examples can be found at Wikipedia.

***

Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

Prompt #27: Still Life

Today’s photos and prompt brought to you by Shanna Germain:

*

*

Using one of the photos above or below, write a ‘still-life’ poem. The goal is to recreate the image(s) with your own filter while still keeping some of the essence of the original. It’s a good time to think about objects and what significance they have on their own versus the significance that is given to them by the viewer/artist/poet.

*

*

***

Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

Prompt #26: Quiet Windows

Today’s prompt is brought to us by Miss Gina Williams:

Turn off the noise. Go to a window. Write what you see, feel and/or want in a stream-of-consciousness form.

***

Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!

Prompt #25: Memes

Today’s prompt brought to you by the internet:

Find an internet meme of some sort. Either one you’ve participated in or one that is new to you. Once you find one that inspires you — yes, you have to leave the internets now and come back to poetry — use the language (lolspeak anyone?), the topic or even the general idea of viral transmissions to create a poem.

As an alternative, check out the meaning of “meme” and its origin (it relates, surprisingly, to genetics and evolution).

***

Reminders for Participants: You can post your poem below in the comments, offer a link back to your site where the poem is posted, or comment about the experience of writing the poem (without actually posting the poem). If you’re going to comment on other participant’s poems, please remember that this is not a critique space — comments should be kept thoughtful and supportive. Lastly, remember you don’t have to use the prompt to write your poem — they’re here for your inspiration but they’re certainly not a requirement.

Let the Wild Poeming Being!